Conservation & Science

Dispatch from the Farallones: White shark family portraits

Monterey Bay Aquarium’s white shark tagging team recently made its annual visit to the Farallon Islands outside San Francisco Bay. The goal: to continue its long-term efforts to monitor a genetically distinct population of adult white sharks, which gathers at the islands each fall to gorge on seals and sea lions.

 During the trip, team members took photos to identify individual sharks by their dorsal fin patterns, collected tissue samples for genetic research, and attached electronic tags to study these majestic ocean predators. Presley Adamson, associate producer and editor for the Aquarium’s film team, reports back on his experiences in the field.


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Approaching the Farallones.

It’s been two hours since we lost sight of the Golden Gate Bridge and, with it, any sign of civilization. Dr. Salvador Jorgensen, senior research scientist for Monterey Bay Aquarium; and Scot Anderson, a pioneering white shark expert and seasonal researcher for the Aquarium, are somehow sleeping through the relentless rocking and rolling of our sailboat. I’m too excited to sleep.

Choppy waves have kept us stuck on shore for six straight days. Today, the waters are finally calm enough for us to cross the 25 miles of open ocean between San Francisco and the Farallon Islands.

The Farallones are technically part of the City of San Francisco, but we won’t find any subdivisions or grocery stores here. The islands, their surrounding waters, and their plant and animal inhabitants are protected in the Farallon National Wildlife Refuge, within the Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary.

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A whale fluke surfaces near our sailboat as we near the Farallon Islands.

More elephant seals and sea lions than people visit the Farallones. The abundance of blubbery pinnipeds attracts some of the largest white sharks in the world, who hang around the islands looking for a meal.

Sal and Scot have brought me along to document this year’s research season. I’m armed with six cameras that need to be set up before we get to the Farallones. I also need to put on foul-weather gear—boots, life jacket, raincoat, and other gear to stay warm and dry. But I’m distracted by a pod of humpback whales next to our boat, showing off their giant flukes as they go about their own morning commute.

I can just start to make out a lone pinnacle emerging from the sea. We’re almost there.

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Shark fins, unique as fingerprints

To most of us, all white sharks look similar: strong, elegant and powerful. But not to Aquarium Senior Research Scientist Dr. Salvador Jorgensen.

“In order to tell them apart, we like to think of something descriptive to call them: Middle-notch, or Split-fin, or Rooster,” Sal says. “There’s one that looks like a profile of Jay Leno. We have a shark called Hitchcock. We have one called Elvis.”

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When you stare at shark fins all day, you might start to see things – like Jay Leno’s profile.

He pulls up a photo of a  dorsal fin—the characteristic, triangular fin on a white shark’s back that features prominently in movies like Jaws—and compares the negative space at the tip to a profile of Jay Leno. The two are an uncanny match.

Like fingerprints and retinas are unique to each person, a dorsal fin is unique to each white shark. Each fin has scars, pockets and notches.

Sal and a number of colleagues from Stanford and Montana State University are taking advantage of these fin fingerprints to identify the same sharks as they return to Central California year after year.

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Act now to end the ivory trade in California!

Update: The California State Assembly overwhelmingly passed the ivory trade ban on June 2. Next step: Hearings and a vote in the State Senate.

California has a chance – right now – to end the ivory trade that’s decimating walruses, narwhals and elephants. And your voice can make a difference.

The State Legislature is about to vote on AB 96, a bill to ban all ivory and rhino horn sales in the state. Legislators need to hear that you want California to be a leader in the fight to keep poachers from slaughtering wildlife into extinction.

AB 96 comes up for a vote in just a few days. Visit www.96elephants.org/California to email your legislators and ask them to make California just the third state in the nation to ban the ivory trade. California represents the second largest market for ivory sales in the United States. A ban here will keep illegal ivory that leaks through our borders from getting to unknowing consumers.

Aquarium supporters made their voices heard when we led the fight to end the shark fin trade in California. That movement continues to spread across the nation.

Now you can speak out for other animals that can’t speak for themselves – elephants, walruses and other creatures whose tusks and horns make them a target for wildlife criminals.

Tell California legislators to end the ivory trade

Photo courtesy U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

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