Conservation & Science

Breeding seahorses to conserve their wild cousins

The courtship of Pacific seahorses begins with an awkward dance.

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A close up of a Pacific seahorse (Hippocampus ingens) in the ¡Viva Baja! Life on the Edge special exhibit.

Over the course of several days, a female and a male seahorse will start to mimic each other’s movements. As their synchronization improves, the couple perfects a routine that involves circling each other, holding tails and swimming upward in unison.

“Their courtship dance involves going up the water column, so they need a few feet of vertical space,” says Jennifer O’Quin Anstey, senior aquarist at the Monterey Bay Aquarium. Her responsibilities include looking after a suitably tall holding tank, in a back room with soft light, behind the aquarium’s ¡Viva Baja! exhibit.

Nearby, smaller tanks are full of baby seahorses. They look like miniature versions of the adults—but begin their lives a dark hue. Their color alternates between black and yellow as they mature.

“People kept telling me how difficult it was to rear them, which only made me more determined to do it,” Jenn says.

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