Conservation & Science

Sustainable local fisheries: the triple bottom line

For as long as humans have lived along Monterey Bay, they’ve found sustenance in the sea. Beginning with the native Ohlone people, and persisting through the arrival of immigrants from the 18th century onward, fishing has always been at the heart of Monterey Bay’s regional identity.

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Monterey harbor. Photo by Melissa Mahoney

“Many immigrants, upon first arrival, went immediately to the shore and began to try and figure out how to make a living from the bay’s bounty,” says Sandy Lydon, emeritus historian at Cabrillo College.

But today, most of the fish sold on Monterey’s own wharves is imported. Paradoxically, the fish caught and landed in Monterey Bay is largely sold for export.

Fisheries in Monterey Bay, as in much of the U.S., are finally sustainable from an environmental standpoint. But in order to preserve our region’s fishing heritage, we need to make it economically worthwhile, too.

At the Aquarium, we want to help keep sustainable fishing in Monterey Bay by demonstrating what we call the triple bottom line: sustainable fisheries, healthy ocean ecosystems and a thriving local economy.

Getting there, however, is a challenge.

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White House honors sustainable seafood champions

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Nominee Mary Sue Milliken serves Alaska Bairdi crab passionfruit aguachile at the Champions of Change reception.

This week, the White House named 12 “Champions of Change for Sustainable Seafood.” The awards recognize the people at the heart of America’s seafood industry—the fishermen, business owners, entrepreneurs, chefs and coastal leaders—who work tirelessly to support both the economic and ecological viability of our nation’s fisheries.

Thanks to their efforts and strong federal oversight, the U.S. remains a global model of seafood sustainability.

Monterey Bay Aquarium is pleased to count several of the winners and nominees among our Seafood Watch Business and Restaurant Partners, Blue Ribbon Task Force members and other collaborators. Working with Seafood Watch, they help raise consumer awareness about seafood sustainability and push for improvements in the supply chain.

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